The Illustration of the Salt Shaker

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All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness,  that the man of God may be complete, equipped for every good work.

2 Timothy 3:16-17

They say that leaders are readers. This old saying is true for all types of leaders, but it especially applies to Christian leaders.

Christian leaders depend on a regular reading intake because they function according to this principle: Before one can give, one must receive. Without a regular intake we become like a salt shaker with no salt. Before any vessel can be emptied, it must first be filled.

But this post is for the Christian leaders out there who may be a bit weary in their reading habits. For various reasons, your Bible study and devotional time isn’t what it used to be. Your time in the Word has become a bit of a grind. That is, if it’s even happening at all.

It’s time to get back to it.

There’s a curious passage in the Old Testament that is targeted specifically at the leaders in the land. It is written in hypothetical terms that if Israel should ever opt for a monarchial form of government (and they did), their chosen king would not be above the law but would be bound to follow certain rules. Among those rules was this one:

And when he sits on the throne of his kingdom, he shall write for himself in a book a copy of this law…And it shall be with him, and he shall read in it all the days of his life, that he may learn to fear the Lord his God by keeping all the words of this law and these statutes, and doing them,

Deuteronomy 17:18-19

Did you catch that? The person at the top of the leadership structure would have a responsibility to read Scripture…every day. He could not delegate this task to someone else. In fact, he was supposed to write it down by himself and read it on a daily.

Why? By doing this the leader would keep perspective, stay humble, remain accountable, and serve people better. (This same idea is repeated in the New Testament where a church leader by the name of Paul instructs another leader, Timothy, to take full advantage of the benefits of Scripture.)

Of course, if you’ve read the narrative of 1 & 2 Kings, you know that most of the kings of Israel let this one drop. They were too busy, too self-important, etc. and their leadership suffered as a result.

Without a regular intake we become like a salt shaker with no salt. Before any vessel can be emptied, it must first be filled.

How about you, leader? Where does regular Bible time fit in your scheme? Do you spend time every day reading it, dwelling on it, and applying it? Is it a priority?

If so, nice going! Stay with it. But if not, it’s time to get back to it.

It’s a new day with God. Run with it.

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